Blog

I'll apologize ahead of time if this comes across as a rant (which it is) about an important topic to dealers (which it should be). When I started on the vendor side of the car business eight years ago, I wanted to build my company's brand based upon education. We felt that the techniques and strategies we were using were not threatened by sharing. In other words, we could help dealers and even competitors learn how to make things better for themselves based upon an idea I heard at a conference once.

Paraphrased, the idea is this. If you educate your potential customers on how to do things for themselves, you'll find that 20% will take the advice and do it, 20% will hear the advice and want you to do it, and 60% won't act at all on the advice. It has proven itself out over the years, which is why I'm not a fan of big booths at trade shows but prefer to speak and educate.

We were blessed to be a pioneer when it came to educating on many of the topics that are hot today such as social, search, and mobile. Over time, we noticed that others were doing the same thing. The various automotive networks became flooded with articles. YouTube exploded with educational videos. New conferences started popping up. Webinars were plentiful regardless of which day you watched.

This site was built on the concept of providing unique content for dealers in some sections and to highlight excellent content that we find from other companies and dealer personnel that can be beneficial. We've even highlighted content from competitors on our Around the Web section because if the content is good and the advice is righteous, we don't care who is delivering the message. Then, something happened. It happened twice, actually, and we're going on a third round of it happening again. I'm having a difficult time finding content. I go to blogs of major companies and see only sporadic posts about new employees or promoting the booth at the next conference. I go to YouTube channels and see tons of promotion but not very many videos that a dealer could watch and actually learn something.

There are exceptions. Some of my favorite people in the automotive industry like Paul Potratz and Brian Pasch are still out there educating while promoting their products. I see nothing wrong with that message - "Here's what you need to know and here's how we can help."

Unfortunately, today I'm having another round of difficulties traveling across the internet searching for worthy content. Why are vendors abandoning the educational aspect of the web? Why aren't they posting at least a blog post every week? We are blessed with several talented people on our team, many of whom are active in educating through articles and best practices. Surely we're not alone, right?

This is an industry that relies on thought leadership. The good news is that there are plenty of thought leaders. The bad news is that many of them have stopped leading. This needs to change.

Email me when people comment –

You need to be a member of Dealer Bar to add comments!

Join Dealer Bar

Comments

  • Not sure to what content you are referring. As I recall, there have been very few non-Pay-For-Play speakers or writers EVER in our industry. It's why watching any conference or workshop session can be a coin flip: Is it a veiled sales pitch or is it useful and honest information that truly has the audience's best interests at heart? (Of course, at least with a coin flip there is a 50/50 chance.... not so with most industry conferences.)

    Sure, some sessions and articles can be both, but the overwhelming majority of the drivel that has been delivered to dealers over the last 15 years is either 100% agenda-driven or worse (most of the Social Media writing done over the last 6 or 7 years borders on malpractice).

    This is why I created SteveStauning.com where I provide 100% of my video training content for free. No agenda (my training schedule is full); no veiled sales pitches (everything we sell is only offered through re-sellers, except our low-margin Mystery Shop product). In fact, I try to always have a banner on my site promoting a charity or cause I believe in. (Today, that banner contains a link to Bryan Armstrong's wife's GoFundMe page.)

    I would love to see a blog, site, magazine or conference that actually edits/oversees the crap that's shared to make sure it's not something that's been posted on 42 other sites, is a sales pitch, or is simply delivering incorrect and untested advice. Any ideas where we can find that in Automotive? 

    • We've discussed doing a conference just like what you're describing. Maybe we should talk about it with you.

This reply was deleted.
matthew wheeler is now a member of Dealer Bar
Mar 23
Simon Leggett shared their blog post on Facebook
Mar 6
Simon Leggett shared their blog post on Facebook
Mar 6
JD Rucker posted a blog post
"The other sites just have too much spam."
That was the complaint that we received most often when discussing with dealers and other vendors about the variety of sites out there that serve the automotive industry. One would have to sift through sale…
Feb 11
John Newber updated their profile
Jan 22
Brad Miller is now a member of Dealer Bar
Nov 10, 2016
Pete Gallego is now a member of Dealer Bar
Oct 28, 2016
Dianne Saunders is now a member of Dealer Bar
Oct 17, 2016
John Newber is now a member of Dealer Bar
Aug 30, 2016
Simon Leggett updated their profile photo
Aug 19, 2016
Simon Leggett posted a blog post
A number of traffic accidents are associated with distracted driving. This includes the use of mobiles which results in severe injuries or even loss of life.The continuous pings on our phones happen to distract us. You feel the urge to attend that m…
Aug 19, 2016
Simon Leggett and Amit joined Dealer Bar
Aug 8, 2016
More…